June 30th Primaries Set Up All-Woman Contests in Colorado and Oklahoma in November


Congressional and statewide primaries were held on Tuesday in three states: Colorado, Oklahoma, and Utah. Some contests in Utah remain too close to call, so this post will be updated as results are determined. Full context about women in the 2020 elections, including candidate lists, summaries, results from previous primaries, and historical comparisons, are available via the Center for American Women and Politics’ Election Watch page.

Among the most notable results for women:

  • Lauren Boebert (R) defeated five-term incumbent Representative Scott Tipton (R) in the Republican primary in Colorado’s 3rd congressional district. She is the second woman candidate to defeat an incumbent in the 2020 cycle (Marie Newman defeated incumbent Representative Dan Lipinski in the Democratic primary in Illinois’ 3rd congressional district earlier this year). Boebert will face Democratic nominee Diane Mitsch Bush in an all-woman general election contest. 
  • Incumbent Representative Kendra Horn (D) won the Democratic nomination for re-election in November. She will face one of two women – Terry Neese or Stephanie Bice – who advanced to the Republican primary runoff election in Oklahoma’s 5th congressional district. This all but ensures that a woman will continue to hold the congressional seat in OK-05. Cook Political Report currently rates this contest as a toss-up. Horn was elected for the first time in 2018, defeating incumbent Representative Steve Russell (R) in 2018 by 1.4 points.
  • Karina Brown is the Democratic nominee for Lieutenant Governor of Utah and both of the candidates leading in the Republican primary for Governor of Utah have selected women as their running mates, all but ensuring that both major-party candidates for Lieutenant Governor of Utah in 2020 will be women.


Colorado

Oklahoma

Utah



Colorado

U.S. Senate

On Tuesday, no women candidates ran for major-party nominations in Colorado’s U.S. Senate contest. Incumbent Senator Cory Gardner (R) was unopposed in the Republican primary and two men (2D) competed for the Democratic primary nomination.

No woman has ever served in the U.S. Senate from Colorado.

U.S. House

There is one (1D) woman in Colorado’s seven-member U.S. House delegation.

Women are 4 (3D, 1R) of 14 (28.6%) major-party nominees selected for U.S. House in Colorado, including 3 of 7 (42.9%) Democrats and 1 of 7 (14.3%) Republicans. All women House candidates were successful in their primary bids in Colorado.

  • Incumbent Representative Diana DeGette (D) was unopposed in the Democratic primary election in Colorado’s 1st congressional district. She is favored to win re-election this fall.
  • Lauren Boebert (R) defeated five-term incumbent Representative Scott Tipton (R) in the Republican primary in Colorado’s 3rd congressional district. She is the second woman candidate to defeat an incumbent in the 2020 cycle (Marie Newman defeated incumbent Representative Dan Lipinski in the Democratic primary in Illinois’ 3rd congressional district earlier this year).
    • Boebert will face Democratic nominee Diane Mitsch Bush in an all-woman general election contest. 
    • Mitsch Bush was the Democratic nominee in CO-03 in 2018, when she lost to Tipton by 7.9 points.
  • Jillian Freeland (D) was unopposed in the Democratic primary to challenge incumbent Representative Doug Lamborn (R) in Colorado’s 5th congressional district. This contest is currently rated as “Solid Republican” by Cook Political Report.

All 4 (3D, 1R) women major-party nominees for the U.S. House from Colorado are white. No woman of color has ever represented Colorado in Congress.

 

Oklahoma

U.S. Senate

Abby Broyles won the Democratic nomination to challenge incumbent Senator Jim Inhofe (R) in November. If successful in November, Broyles would be the first woman to serve in the U.S. Senate from Oklahoma. Cook Political Report currently rates this race as “Solid Republican.”

U.S. House

Currently, one woman – Representative Kendra Horn (D) – serves in Oklahoma’s five-member delegation to the U.S. House (20%).

Women are 4 (4D) of 9 (44.4%) major-party nominees already selected for U.S. House in Oklahoma, including 4 of 5 (80%) Democrats and 0 of 4 (0%) Republicans. Another 2 (2R) women advanced to the Republican primary runoff election in Oklahoma’s 5th congressional district. 3 (3R) women candidates were unsuccessful in their primary bids for the U.S. House.

  • Incumbent Representative Kendra Horn (D) won the Democratic nomination for re-election in November. She will face one of two women – Terry Neese or Stephanie Bice – who advanced to the Republican primary runoff election in Oklahoma’s 5th congressional district. This all but ensures that a woman will continue to hold the congressional seat in OK-05. Cook Political Report currently rates this contest as a toss-up. Horn was elected for the first time in 2018, defeating incumbent Representative Steve Russell (R) in 2018 by 1.4 points.
  • 3(3D) women will run as challengers to incumbents in November. All are running in general election contests that strongly favor their opponents.
    • Danyell Lanier (D) was unopposed in the Democratic primary to challenge incumbent Representative Markwayne Mullin (R) in Oklahoma’s 2nd congressional district. This contest is currently rated as “Solid Republican” by Cook Political Report. If elected, Lanier – who identifies as Black and Native American – would be the first woman of color to represent Oklahoma in the U.S. Congress.
    • Zoe Midyett (D) was unopposed in the Democratic primary to challenge incumbent Representative Frank Lucas (R) in Oklahoma’s 3rd congressional district. This contest is currently rated as “Solid Republican” by Cook Political Report.
    • Mary Brannon (D) won the Democratic nomination to challenge incumbent Representative Tom Cole in Oklahoma’s 4th congressional district. This contest is currently rated as “Solid Republican” by Cook Political Report.

Statewide Elected Executive Office

Women currently hold 4 (4R) of 11 statewide elected executive offices in Oklahoma (36.4%). Just one of those offices is up for election this year: corporation commissioner. There are three corporation commissioners elected statewide in Oklahoma. Among them, there is currently one woman – Dana Murphy (R) – who also serves as Chair of the commission. She is not up for re-election this year.

There were no women candidates in the primary contests for corporation commissioner this year.

 

Utah

U.S. House

There are currently no women in Utah’s four-member congressional delegation.

As of Wednesday morning, women are 0 of 6 (0%) major-party nominees already selected for U.S. House in Utah, including 0 of 3 (0%) Democrats and 0 of 3 (0%) Republicans. 2 (1D, 1R) women candidates are in races still too close to call in Utah’s 1st congressional district primaries. 6 (6R) women House candidates lost their primary bids for the U.S. House at the convention stage and another (1R) woman was defeated in her party’s primary election.

  • The only open-seat U.S. House contest in Utah this year is in the 1st congressional district, where both primaries remain too close to call. Men are currently leading in both contests. Cook Political Report currently rates this seat as “Solid Republican.”

Statewide Elected Executive Office

There are currently no women holding any of Utah’s five statewide elected executive offices, including governor and lieutenant governor. All five offices are up for election in 2020.

This year, women are 1 of 5 (20%) major-party nominees for statewide elected executive offices already selected in Utah, including 1 of 3 (33.3%) Democrats and 0 of 2 (0%) Republicans. 1 (1R) woman candidate was unsuccessful in her primary bid for statewide elected executive office at the convention stage.

  • Aimee Winder Newton ran in the Republican Party convention for the gubernatorial nomination, but did not advance to the primary election. No woman will be a major-party nominee for Governor of Utah this year.
    • One woman has served as Governor of Utah. Olene Walker was appointed in 2003 and served until January 2005.
  • Karina Brown is the Democratic nominee for Lieutenant Governor, as her and Democratic gubernatorial nominee Chris Peterson won their party’s nomination outright at the convention. No Democratic woman has served as Lieutenant Governor of Utah.
  • Both of the candidates leading in the Republican primary for Governor of Utah have selected women as their running mates, all but ensuring that both major-party candidates for Lieutenant Governor of Utah in 2020 will be women. 
  • No women ran as major-party candidates for attorney general, state auditor, or state treasurer in 2020.
    • No woman has ever served as state auditor or state treasurer in Utah.
    • Just 1 (1D) woman has served as Utah’s attorney general: Jan Graham (1993-2001).

Early Results for Women from June 23rd Primary Elections


Congressional and statewide primaries were held on Tuesday in three states: Kentucky, New York, and Virginia. Runoff congressional elections were also held in North Carolina and Mississippi. Due to the reliance on mail-in voting, many races remain too close to call, so this post will be updated as results are determined. Full context about women in the 2020 elections, including candidate lists, summaries, results from previous primaries, and historical comparisons, are available via the Center for American Women and Politics’ Election Watch page.


Among the most notable results for women thus far:

  • Two of three of Virginia’s women representatives to the U.S. House – Representatives Elaine Luria (D) and Abigail Spanberger (D) – will run in competitive contests in November to defend the seats they first won in 2018. The third incumbent – Representative Jennifer Wexton (D) – will be challenged by another woman – Aliscia Andrews (R) – in a general election contest currently favoring Wexton.
  • While at least one woman will be a U.S. House nominee in Kentucky this year, no women are favored to win in November. Kentucky has not had a woman serve in the U.S. House since 2007. Amy McGrath (D) will challenge incumbent Senator Mitch McConnell (R) in November; she would be the first woman in the U.S. Senate from Kentucky. 
  • Lynda Bennett (R), who was endorsed by President Trump and former Representative Mark Meadows, was defeated in the Republican primary runoff in North Carolina’s 11th congressional district. This would have been a likely pick-up for Republican women.
  • 13 (7D, 6R) women have already secured major-party nominations in New York’s U.S. House races, including 5 (4D, 1R) of the 7 (6D, 1R) incumbent women representatives running for re-election this year (Representative Nita Lowey is not running for re-election). There will be at least one all-woman contest in New York’s congressional elections this fall, a rematch from 2018 between Representative Elise Stefanik (R) and Tedra Cobb (D) in New York’s 21st congressional district. Former Representative Claudia Tenney (R) will also run to reclaim her seat in New York’s 22nd congressional district.

Kentucky

New York

Virginia

North Carolina

 

Kentucky

U.S. Senate

Amy McGrath (D) won in the Democratic nomination to challenge Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R) this November. This U.S. Senate contest is currently rated as "Lean Republican" by Cook Political Report. No woman has ever served in the U.S. Senate from Kentucky.

McGrath (D) was the Democratic nominee for Kentucky’s 6th congressional district in 2018. She lost by 3.2 points to incumbent Representative Andy Barr (R).

U.S. House

There are no women in Kentucky’s six-member U.S. House delegation. No woman has served in the U.S. House from Kentucky since 2007. 

As of June 30th, women are 0 of 10 (0%) major-party nominees already selected for U.S. House in Kentucky, including 0 of 5 (0%) Democrats and 0 of 5 (0%) Republicans. 3 (2D, 1R) women candidates are in races still too close to call in two district primaries, including 2 (2D) women who are the only candidates for the Democratic nomination in Kentucky’s 4th congressional district, ensuring that there will be at least one woman U.S. House nominee from Kentucky this year. She will challenge incumbent Representative Thomas Massie (R) in a contest currently rated as “Solid Republican” by Cook Political Report. Thus far, 1 (1R) woman House candidate was unsuccessful in her primary bid for the U.S. House.

 

New York

U.S. House

Women are currently 8 (7D, 1R) of 27 members of the New York delegation to the U.S. House (29.6%).

As of June 30th, women are 13 (7D, 6R) of 35 (37.1%) major-party nominees already selected for U.S. House in New York, including 7 of 15 (46.7%) Democrats and 6 of 20 (30%) Republicans. 22 (17D, 5R) women candidates are in races still too close to call in 12 party primaries in 11 congressional districts. Thus far, 5 (4D, 1R) women House candidates were unsuccessful in their primary bids for the U.S. House.

  • 7 (6D, 1R) of 8 incumbent women House members from New York are running for re-election. Representative Nita Lowey (D) is not running for re-election. She has served in the U.S. House since 1989.
    • 2 (1D, 1R) incumbent women were unopposed in the primary: Kathleen Rice (D, NY-04) and Elise Stefanik (R, NY-21). Stefanik will be challenged in November by Democratic nominee Tedra Cobb (D) in an all-woman contest.
    • 3 (3D) more incumbent women have won their primaries: Grace Meng (D, NY-06), Nydia Velazquez (D, NY-07), and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D, NY-14).
    • 2 (2D) incumbent women – Yvette Clarke (D, NY-09) and Carolyn Maloney (D, NY-12) – remain in contests that are too close to call.
  • No women have been nominated yet in open U.S. House seats in New York, but 2 (2D) women are the only candidates running for the Democratic nomination in the 2nd congressional district, currently held by Representative Peter King (R). King is not running for re-election. This race is currently rated as “Lean Republican” by Cook Political Report.
    • 12 (10D, 2R) women in total remain in open-seat contests that are too close to call.
  • At least 8 (3D, 5R) women will run as challengers to incumbents in November. 8 (5D, 3R) women challengers remain in contests that are too close to call.
    • Former Representative Claudia Tenney (R), who served one term in the U.S. House from 2017-2019, will run to reclaim her seat in New York’s 22nd congressional district. Tenney lost to current Representative Anthony Brindisi (D) by 1.8 points in 2018. This race is currently rated as a toss-up by Cook Political Report.
    • Dana Balter will challenge incumbent Representative John Katko (R) New York's 24th congressional district. Balter lost to Katko in 2018 by 5.2 points. This race is currently rated as “Likely Republican” by Cook Political Report.
    • 6 (2D, 4D) women candidates were unopposed in the primary and are challenging incumbents in general election contests that favor their opponents.
      • Cathy Bernstein (R) was unopposed in the Republican primary to challenge incumbent Representative Jerry Nadler (D) in New York’s 10th congressional district. This contest is currently rated as “Solid Democratic” by Cook Political Report.
      • Lovelynn Gwinn (R) was unopposed in the Republican primary to challenge incumbent Representative Adriano Espaillat (D) in New York’s 13th congressional district. This contest is currently rated as “Solid Democratic” by Cook Political Report.
      • Chele Farley (R) was unopposed in the Republican primary to challenge incumbent Representative Sean Patrick Maloney (D) in New York’s 18th congressional district. This contest is currently rated as “Likely Democratic” by Cook Political Report.
      • Elizabeth Joy (R) was unopposed in the Republican primary to challenge incumbent Representative Paul Tonko (D) in New York’s 20th congressional district. This contest is currently rated as “Solid Democratic” by Cook Political Report.
      • Tedra Cobb (D) was unopposed in the Democratic primary to challenge incumbent Representative Elise Stefanik (R) in New York’s 21st congressional district. She was the Democratic nominee in 2018 and lost to Stefanik by 13.7 points. This contest is currently rated as “Solid Republican” by Cook Political Report.
      • Tracy Mitrano (D) was unopposed in the Democratic primary to challenge incumbent Representative Tom Reed (R) in New York’s 23rd congressional district. She was the Democratic nominee in 2018 and lost to Reed by 8.4 points. This race is currently rated as “Solid Republican” by Cook Political Report.

Of the 13 (7D, 6R) women who are already selected as major-party nominees for the U.S. House from New York, 4 (3D, 1R) are women of color, including 2 (2D) Latinas and 2 (1D, 1R) Asian American women.

 

Virginia

U.S. Senate

On Tuesday, three candidates ran in the Republican primary to challenge incumbent Senator Mark Warner (D) in November. Alissa Baldwin – the only woman to run for the U.S. Senate in Virginia this year – was unsuccessful in her bid for the Republican nomination. No woman has ever served in the U.S. Senate from Virginia.

U.S. House

Currently, women are 3 (3D) of 11 members of the Virginia delegation to the U.S. House (27.3%).

Women are 5 (3D, 2R) of 18 (27.8%) major-party nominees already selected for U.S. House in Virginia, including 3 of 9 (33.3%) Democrats and 2 of 9 (22.2%) Republicans. 4 (4D) women candidates were unsuccessful in their primary bids for the U.S. House. Because Virginia uses mixed methods of party nomination, 2 (2R) nominees have yet to be selected and will be chosen in party conventions.

  • All (3D) incumbent women, who are each in their first terms in Congress, were unopposed in bids for their party’s nomination.
    • 2 (2D) incumbent women – Representatives Elaine Luria (VA-02) and Abigail Spanberger (VA-07) – are in contests currently deemed toss-ups by Cook Political Report.
    • Representative Jennifer Wexton (D) will be challenged by Republican nominee Aliscia Andrews in Virginia’s 10th congressional district. This all-woman contest is currently rated “Likely Democratic” by Cook Political Report.
  • 2 (2R) women will run as challengers to incumbents in November. Both were selected via party conventions.
    • Aliscia Andrews (R) will challenge incumbent Representative Jennifer Wexton (D) in Virginia’s 10th congressional district. This all-woman contest is currently rated “Likely Democratic” by Cook Political Report.
    • Manga Anantatmula will challenge incumbent Representative Gerry Connolly (D) in Virginia’s 11th congressional district. This contest is currently rated as “Solid Democratic” by Cook Political Report. If elected, Anantatmula – who is Indian American – would be the first woman of color to represent Virginia in Congress.

 

North Carolina

One woman – Lynda Bennett – ran in the runoff Republican primary election in North Carolina’s 11th congressional district. Despite endorsements from former Representative Mark Meadows (R), who held the seat until March 2020, and President Donald Trump, she was defeated by Madison Cawthorn.

With the runoff elections complete, women are 7 of 26 (26.9%) major-party nominees for the U.S. House in North Carolina, including 5 of 13 (38.5%) Democratic nominees and 2 of 13 (15.4%) Republican nominees.

Women Candidates Have Successes in June 9th Primaries, but Many Face Difficult General Election Prospects

 

Congressional and statewide primaries were held on Tuesday in five states: Georgia, Nevada, North Dakota, South Carolina, West Virginia. Full context about women in the 2020 elections, including candidate lists, summaries, results from previous primaries, and historical comparisons, are available via the Center for American Women and Politics’ Election Watch page.


Among the most notable results for women:

  • While women won nominations in many congressional and statewide executive primaries on Tuesday, few non-incumbent women candidates will be competitive in November. Exceptions include:
    • Former Representative Karen Handel (R) will challenge incumbent Representative Lucy McBath (D) in Georgia’s 6th congressional district. McBath defeated Handel in 2018 by 1 point (just over 3,000 votes). This all-woman contest is currently rated as a toss-up by Cook Political Report.
    • State Representative Nancy Mace (R) will challenge incumbent Representative Joe Cunningham (D) in South Carolina’s 1st congressional district, which is currently rated as a toss-up by Cook Political Report (Cunningham flipped the U.S. House seat from Republican to Democrat in 2018). If Mace is elected in November, she will be the first Republican woman in Congress from South Carolina as well as the first woman since 1993 to represent South Carolina in Congress.
  • Women are also in some key runoff contests to watch in Georgia.
    • Carolyn Bourdeaux and Brenda Lopez Romero will compete in an August runoff for the Democratic nomination in Georgia’s 7th congressional district, an open-seat contest. In 2018, Bourdeaux lost to incumbent Representative Rob Woodall (R) by just 300 votes. This general election contest is currently rated as a toss-up by Cook Political Report.
    • Marjorie Greene will compete in the August runoff for the Republican nomination in Georgia’s 14th congressional district, another open-seat contest. This general election contest is currently rated as “Solid Republican” by Cook Political Report.
  • Dr. Shelley Lenz (D) became the first woman to win a gubernatorial nomination in 2020. She was unopposed in the Democratic primary for governor of North Dakota. Lenz will challenge incumbent Governor Doug Burgum (R), who is strongly favored to win re-election this fall.

Georgia

Nevada

North Dakota

South Carolina

West Virginia



Georgia

U.S. Senate

Both U.S. Senate seats in Georgia are up for election this year. In addition to the regularly-scheduled re-election contest for incumbent Senator David Perdue (R), incumbent Senator Kelly Loeffler (R) – who was appointed to the U.S. Senate by Governor Brian Kemp (R) in late 2019 (and sworn in January 2020) – is running in a special U.S. Senate election to complete former Senator Johnny Isakson’s (R) term (through 2022). Georgia’s special election for the U.S. Senate will not happen until November 3, 2020, when all candidates – Republicans and Democrats – will compete in a jungle primary.

On Tuesday, candidates ran in the Democratic primary to challenge Senator David Perdue (R), who was unopposed in the Republican primary, this November. 4 (4D) women were defeated in the Democratic primary.

No Democratic woman has served in the U.S. Senate from Georgia since 1922, when Rebecca Latimer Felton was appointed to fill a vacancy and served for one day in 1922. She was the first woman ever to serve in the U.S. Senate.

U.S. House

Women are currently 1 (1D) of 14 members of the Georgia delegation to the U.S. House (7.1%).

Women are 8 (4D, 4R) of 22 (36.4%) major-party nominees already selected for U.S. House in Georgia, including 4 of 10 (40%) Democrats and 4 of 12 (33.3%) Republicans. Another 7 (6D, 1R) women have advanced to runoff elections on August 11, 2020 in 5 congressional primaries. 13 (5D, 8R) women House candidates were unsuccessful in their primary bids for the U.S. House.

  • Incumbent Representative Lucy McBath (D) was unopposed in her primary and will run for re-election in Georgia’s 6th congressional district. She will be challenged by former Representative Karen Handel (R), who held the seat from 2017-2018 (she won a special election in 2017) and was defeated by McBath in 2018 by 1 point (just over 3,000 votes). This race is considered a toss-up by Cook Political Report.
  • 7 (3D, 4R) women, including Handel, will run as challengers to incumbents in November. All but Handel (R) are running in general election contests that strongly favor their opponents.
    • Johsie Cruz (R) was unopposed in the Republican primary to challenge incumbent Representative Hank Johnson (D) in Georgia’s 4th congressional district. This contest is rated as “Solid Democratic” by Cook Political Report.
    • Angela Stanton-King (R) was unopposed in the Republican primary to challenge incumbent Representative John Lewis (D) in Georgia’s 5th congressional district. This contest is rated as “Solid Democratic” by Cook Political Report.
    • Tabitha Johnson-Green won the Democratic nomination to challenge incumbent Representative Jody Hice (R) in Georgia’s 10th congressional district. This is a re-match of the 2018 election, where Johnson-Green lost to Hice by 26 points. This contest is rated as “Solid Republican” by Cook Political Report.
    • Dana Barrett (D) was unopposed in the Democratic primary to challenge incumbent Representative Barry Loudermilk (R) in Georgia’s 11th congressional district. This contest is rated as “Solid Republican” by Cook Political Report.
    • Liz Johnson (D) won the Democratic nomination to challenge incumbent Representative Rick Allen (R) in Georgia’s 12th congressional district. This contest is rated as “Solid Republican” by Cook Political Report.
    • Becky Hites (R) won the Republican nomination to challenge incumbent Representative David Scott (D) in Georgia’s 13th congressional district. This contest is rated as “Solid Democrat” by Cook Political Report.
  • 7 (6D, 1R) women have advanced to runoff elections on August 11, 2020 in 5 congressional primaries, including 3 open-seat contests.
    • Carolyn Bourdeaux and Brenda Lopez Romero will compete in an August runoff for the Democratic nomination in Georgia’s 7th congressional district, an open-seat contest. In 2018, Bourdeaux lost to incumbent Representative Rob Woodall (R) by just 300 votes. This general election contest is currently rated as a toss-up by Cook Political Report.
    • Marjorie Greene will compete in the August runoff for the Republican nomination in Georgia’s 14th congressional district, another open-seat contest. This general election contest is currently rated as “Solid Republican” by Cook Political Report.
    • Brooke Siskin will compete in an August runoff for the Democratic nomination in Georgia’s 9th congressional district, another open-seat contest. This general election contest is currently rated as "Solid Republican" by Cook Political Report.
    • Lisa Ring and Joyce Griggs will compete in an August runoff for the Democratic nomination in Georgia's 1st congressional district. The winner will challenge incumbent Representative Buddy Carter (R) in a contest currently rated as "Solid Republican" by Cook Political Report.
    • Keisha Waites will compete in an August runoff for the Democratic nomination in Georgia’s 13th congressional district. She is a primary challenger to incumbent Representative David Scott (D) in a district that strongly favors the Democratic nominee in November.

Of the 8 (4D, 4R) women who are already selected as major-party nominees for the U.S. House from Georgia, 5 (3D, 2R) are women of color, including 4 (3D, 1R) Black women – incumbent Representative Lucy McBath (D, GA-06), Tabitha Johnson-Green (D, GA-10), Liz Johnson (D, GA-12), and Angela Stanton-King (R, GA-05) – and 1 (1R) Latina – Johsie Cruz (R, GA-04). No Latina has ever represented Georgia in Congress. Georgia has previously sent 3 (3D) Black women to Congress: current incumbent Lucy McBath (D, 2019-Present), Denise Majette (D, 2003-2005), and Cynthia McKinney (D, 1993-2003; 2005-2007).



Nevada

U.S. House

Women are currently 2 (2D) of 4 members of the Nevada delegation to the U.S. House (50%).

Women are 4 (3D, 1R) of 8 (50%) major-party nominees for U.S. House in Nevada, including 3 of 4 (75%) Democrats and 1 of 4 (25%) Republicans. 9 (3D, 6R) women House candidates were unsuccessful in their primary bids for the U.S. House.

  • Both incumbent women representatives – Representatives Susie Lee (D) and Dina Titus (D) – won primary nominations for re-election this fall.
    • Cook Political Report currently rates Representative Titus’ race in the 1st congressional district as “Solid Democratic.”
    • Cook Political Report currently rates Representative Lee’s race in the 3rd congressional district as “Lean Democratic.” In 2018, Lee won her U.S. House seat for the first time by 9 points.
  • Patricia Ackerman won the Democratic primary in Nevada's 2nd congressional district. This contest is currently rated as "Solid Republican" by Cook Political Report. 
  • Joyce Bentley won the Republican primary in Nevada's 1st congressional district to challenge incumbent Representative Dina Titus (D) in an all-woman contest where Titus is strongly favored to win re-election. Bentley identifies as Asian American and White. 



North Dakota

There were only 3 (2D, 1NP) women on the primary ballots for North Dakota’s congressional and statewide executive elections in 2020.

U.S. House

No women ran for North Dakota’s at-large U.S. House district in 2020. The seat, currently held by Representative Kelly Armstrong (R), is rated as “Solid Republican” by Cook Political Report. No woman has ever represented North Dakota in the U.S. House.

Statewide Elected Executive Office

Women currently hold 3 (2R, 1NP) of 13 statewide elected executive offices in North Dakota (23.1%). Seven of those offices are up for election this year: governor, lieutenant governor, treasurer, state auditor, commissioner of insurance, public service commissioner, and superintendent of public instruction. While there are 3 public service commissioners who are elected statewide, just one of those seats is up for election in 2020.

Women are 3 (2D, 1NP) of 14 (21.4%) major-party and non-partisan nominees for statewide executive offices in North Dakota, including 2 of 6 (33.3%) Democrats, 1 of 2 (50%) non-partisan nominees, 0 of 6 (0%) Republicans. No women candidates were unsuccessful in their primary bids for statewide executive offices.

  • Incumbent Superintendent of Public Instruction Kirsten Baesler (NP) was the leading vote-getter in the non-partisan primary for her office; she will proceed to the general election.
  • Dr. Shelley Lenz (D) was unopposed in the Democratic primary for Governor of North Dakota. Lenz will challenge Incumbent Governor Doug Burgum (R), who is strongly favored to win re-election this fall.
  • Travisia Martin (D) was unopposed in the Democratic primary to challenge incumbent Insurance Commissioner Jon Godfread (R). No woman has ever been elected as Insurance Commissioner of North Dakota. If elected, Martin – who is Black – would also be the first woman of color elected statewide in North Dakota. 



South Carolina

U.S. Senate

No women ran for the U.S. Senate in South Carolina this year to challenge incumbent Senator Lindsey Graham (R). No woman has served in the U.S. Senate from South Carolina.

U.S. House

There are no women currently serving in South Carolina’s 7-member delegation to the U.S. House.

Women are 4 (3D, 1R) of 14 (28.6%) major-party nominees for U.S. House in South Carolina, including 3 of 7 (42.9%) Democrats and 1 of 7 (14.3%) Republicans. 1 (1R) woman House candidate was unsuccessful in her primary bid for the U.S. House. All 4 (3D, 1R) women U.S. House nominees from South Carolina will run as challengers to incumbents in November.

  • State Representative Nancy Mace (R) won the Republican nomination in South Carolina’s 1st congressional district, which is currently rated as a toss-up by Cook Political Report. She will challenge incumbent Representative Joe Cunningham (D), who flipped the U.S. House seat from Republican to Democrat in 2018. If elected in November, Mace will be the first Republican woman in Congress from South Carolina as well as the first woman since 1993 to represent South Carolina in Congress.
  • 3 (3D) women will run as challengers to incumbents in districts that strongly favor their opponents.
    • Adair Burroughs (D) was unopposed in the Democratic primary to challenge incumbent Representative Joe Wilson (R) in South Carolina’s 2nd congressional district. This contest is currently rated as “Solid Republican” by Cook Political Report.
    • Kim Nelson (D) was unopposed in the Democratic primary to challenge incumbent Representative Bill Timmons (R) in South Carolina’s 4th congressional district. This contest is currently rated as “Solid Republican” by Cook Political Report.
    • Melissa Watson (D) won the Democratic nomination to challenge incumbent Representative Tom Rice (R) in South Carolina’s 7th congressional district. This contest is currently rated as “Solid Republican” by Cook Political Report.

Of the 4 (3D, 1R) women who are major-party nominees for the U.S. House from South Carolina, only Melissa Watson (D) – who is Black – is a woman of color. If elected, Watson would be the first woman of color to represent South Carolina in the U.S. Congress.



West Virginia

U.S. Senate

Incumbent Senator Shelley Moore Capito (R) is the only woman who has served in the U.S. Senate from West Virginia. She has served since 2015 and is up for re-election this year.

Capito (R) won the Republican nomination and is strongly favored to keep her seat in November. She will be challenged by Paula Jean Swearengin (D) in an all-woman contest. Swearengin also ran for the U.S. Senate in 2018, challenging Senator Joe Manchin (D) in the Democratic primary; she lost by 40 points.

Capito previously served in the U.S. House from 2001 to 2015.

U.S. House

Women are currently 1 (1R) of 3 members of the West Virginia delegation to the U.S. House (33.3%).

As of Wednesday morning, women are 3 (2D, 1R) of 5 (60%) major-party nominees for U.S. House in West Virginia, including 2 of 2 (100%) Democrats and 1 of 3 (33.3%) Republicans. 1 (1D) woman remains in the Democratic primary in West Virginia’s 3rd congressional district, which is too close to call.

  • Incumbent Representative Carol Miller (R) is running for re-election. She was the only Republican woman running for the U.S. House from West Virginia this year. Miller is strongly favored to win re-election; West Virginia’s 3rd congressional district seat is rated as “Solid Republican” by Cook Political Report. 
  • 2 (2D) women will run as challengers to incumbents in districts that strongly favor their opponents.
    • Natalie Cline (D) won the Democratic primary to challenge incumbent Representative David McKinley (R) in West Virginia’s 3rd congressional district. This contest is currently rated as “Solid Republican” by Cook Political Report.
    • Cathy Kunkel (D) was unopposed in the Democratic primary to challenge incumbent Representative Alex Mooney (R) in West Virginia’s 2nd congressional district. This contest is currently rated as “Solid Republican” by Cook Political Report.

All women congressional nominees in West Virginia are White. West Virginia has never sent a woman of color to Congress.

Statewide Elected Executive Office

Women currently hold 0 of 6 statewide elected executive offices in West Virginia. Each of those offices are up for election this year: governor, attorney general, secretary of state, treasurer, state auditor, and commissioner of agriculture.

Women are 2 (2D) of 12 (16.7%) major-party nominees for statewide executive offices in West Virginia, including 2 of 6 (33.3%) Democrats and 0 of 6 (0%) Republicans. This includes the Democratic primary nomination for attorney general, which remains too close to call, but there are no women running in this race.

  • Former Secretary of State Natalie Tennant (D) was unopposed in the Democratic primary for Secretary of State of West Virginia. Tennant will challenge incumbent Secretary of State Mac Warner (R) to reclaim the office she held from 2009 to 2017. To date, Tennant is the only Democratic woman to win statewide elected office in West Virginia. 
  • Mary Ann Claytor (D) was unopposed in the Democratic primary to challenge incumbent State Auditor JB McCuskey (R). No woman has ever been elected as State Auditor of West Virginia. If elected, Claytor – who is Black – would also be the first woman of color elected statewide in West Virginia.
  • Shelby Jean Fitzhugh (R), the only woman candidate running for Governor of West Virginia, was unsuccessful in her primary bid. No woman has ever served as Governor of West Virginia.

There were no women candidates for attorney general, commissioner of agriculture, or state treasurer in West Virginia.  

Women Will Dominate General Election Ballots in Iowa and New Mexico This Fall


Congressional and statewide primaries were held on Tuesday in seven states: Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, Montana, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, and South Dakota. Results were also reported from Idaho’s May 19th primary election. Due to the reliance on mail-in voting, some races remain too close to call, so this post will be updated as results are determined. Full context about women in the 2020 elections, including candidate lists, summaries, results from previous primaries, and historical comparisons, are available via the Center for American Women and Politics’ (CAWP) Election Watch page.

Among the most notable results for women:

  • Women are the majority of congressional nominees in Iowa and New Mexico this year.
    • There are competitive all-woman contests in Iowa for the U.S. Senate and in Iowa’s 1st and 2nd congressional districts. This is especially notable because Iowa elected its first woman to Congress in 2014 and its first women to the U.S. House in 2018.
    • Women are 5 of 6 U.S. House nominees already selected in New Mexico, with a woman leading in the Republican primary election in New Mexico’s 3rd congressional district. If she secures the nomination, all major-party nominees for the U.S. House from New Mexico will be women.
  • New Mexico is likely to have an all-woman delegation to the U.S. House in 2021, and that delegation could be all women of color.
    • In New Mexico’s 3rd congressional district – an open seat contest – Teresa Leger Fernandez (D) won the Democratic nomination and is strongly favored to win in November. If she succeeds, New Mexico’s House delegation would be all women in 2021. This would not be the first all-woman House delegation, but it will be the largest. All-woman U.S. House delegations of more than one member have served from both Hawaii and New Hampshire.
    • If Fernandez wins and incumbent Representative Xochitl Torres Small successfully retains her seat in November, New Mexico’s House delegation would also be all women of color in 2021. This would be the largest all-woman of color U.S. House delegation to date. Women of color have previously held both offices in Hawaii's two-member House delegation.
  • At the congressional level, 11 woman versus woman general election congressional contests resulted from Tuesday’s primaries: IA Senate, IA-01, IA-02, IN-02, IN-05, NM-01, NM-02, NM-03, PA-04, PA-05, and PA-07. These add to the 10 woman versus woman contests already decided this primary season. By comparison, there were 33 total woman versus woman general election congressional contests in 2018 at the congressional and statewide executive levels. This year’s contest for Montana Superintendent of Public Instruction will also be between 2 women.
    • Among these congressional contests, two districts, IA-02 and NM-03, are all but guaranteed to be pick-ups for women in Congress, and another district, IN-05, will see a new woman enter Congress in the seat of retiring Representative Susan Brooks. The remaining races feature a woman incumbent.
  • No women advanced in South Dakota’s congressional elections and women nominees are not favored to win Idaho and Maryland’s congressional contests, making it likely that these states’ congressional delegations will remain all-male in 2021.

Idaho

Indiana

Iowa

Maryland

Montana

New Mexico

Pennsylvania

South Dakota


Idaho

U.S. Senate

Paulette Jordan (D) won the Democratic nomination to challenge incumbent Republican Senator Jim Risch (R) in Idaho’s U.S. Senate contest. Jordan was the Democratic nominee for Governor of Idaho in 2018, becoming the first Native American woman to win a major-party nomination for governor in the U.S. If successful in 2020, Jordan would be the first Native American woman in the U.S. Senate and the first woman senator from Idaho. However, Cook Political Report currently rates this race as “Solid Republican,” favoring the incumbent senator.

U.S. House

There are no women currently serving in Idaho’s two-member delegation to the U.S. House and that will not change in 2021. Women are 0 of 4 (0%) major-party nominees for U.S. House in Idaho. One (1D) woman House candidate – Staniela Nikolova – was unsuccessful in her primary bid for the U.S. House.


Indiana

U.S. House

Women are currently 2 (2R) of 9 members of the Indiana delegation to the U.S. House (22.2%). Incumbent Representative Susan Brooks (R) is not running for re-election this year.

Women are 7 (4D, 3R) of 18 (38.9%) major-party nominees for U.S. House in Indiana, including 4 of 9 (44.4%) Democrats and 3 of 9 (33.3%) Republicans. 10 (8D, 2R) women House candidates were unsuccessful in their primary bids for the U.S. House.

  • Incumbent Jackie Walorski (R) will be challenged by Pat Hackett (D) in an all-woman contest in Indiana’s 2nd congressional district. Cook Political Report currently rates this contest as “Solid Republican.”
  • Victoria Spartz (R) and Christina Hale (D) will compete in an all-woman contest to replace retiring Representative Susan Brooks (R) in Indiana’s 5th congressional district this fall. Cook Political Report currently rates the contest as “Lean Republican.”
  • 3 (2D, 1R) more women will run as challengers to incumbents in districts that strongly favor their opponents.

Of the 7 (4D, 3R) women who are major-party nominees for the U.S. House from Indiana, 4  (3D, 1R) are women of color, including 2 (1D, 1R) Black women – Jeannine Lee Lake (D, IN-06) and Susan Smith (R, IN-07), 1 (1D) multi-racial woman – Thomasina Marsili (D, IN-08), and 1 (1D) Latina – Christina Hale (D, IN-05). If elected, Christina Hale (D) would be the first Latina to represent Indiana in Congress.

Governor and Lieutenant Governor

No women ran for Governor of Indiana this year, but current Lieutenant Governor Suzanne Crouch will run for re-election with Governor Eric Holcomb in November. No woman has ever served as governor of Indiana.


Iowa

U.S. Senate

Incumbent Senator Joni Ernst (R) is the first and only woman senator from Iowa. She is up for re-election this year and was unopposed for the Republican nomination. Theresa Greenfield (D) won the Democratic nomination to challenge Ernst in November. Cook Political Report currently rates this contest as “Lean Republican.” If Greenfield defeats Ernst in the fall, she would be the first Democratic woman in the U.S. Senate from Iowa.   

U.S. House

Women are 2 (2D) of 4 members of the Iowa delegation to the U.S. House (50%). Both incumbent Representatives Cindy Axne (D) and Abby Finkenauer (D) were elected in 2018; they are the first women to serve in the U.S. House from Iowa.

Women are 5 (3D, 2R) of 8 (62.5%) major-party nominees for U.S. House in Iowa, including 3 of 4 (75%) Democrats and 2 of 4 (50%) Republicans. All women House candidates in Iowa were successful in their primary bids for the U.S. House.

  • Both (2D) of Iowa’s incumbent women representatives are running for re-election in competitive general election contests. Both won their seats for the first time in 2018 by flipping their districts from Republican to Democrat.
    • In Iowa’s 1st congressional district, Ashley Hinson (R) will challenge incumbent Representative Abby Finkenauer (D) in a contest deemed a toss-up by Cook Political Report.
    • In Iowa’s 3rd congressional district, incumbent Representative Cindy Axne (D) will seek to hold her seat in another contest deemed a toss-up by Cook Political Report.
  • In Iowa’s 2nd congressional district, Rita Hart (D) and Marianette Miller-Meeks (R) will compete in an all-woman contest that Cook Political Report currently rates as a toss-up. Regardless of which woman wins, Iowa will send a new woman member to the U.S. House in 2021.

All 5 (3D, 2R) women major-party nominees for the U.S. House from Iowa are White women. Iowa has never sent a woman of color to the U.S. Congress.


Maryland

U.S. House

There are no women currently serving in Maryland’s 8-member delegation to the U.S. House.

As of Wednesday morning, a woman is 1 of 11 (9.1%) major-party nominees for U.S. House in Maryland, including 0 of 7 (0%) Democrats and 1 of 4 (25%) Republicans already selected. 6 (3D, 3R) women remain in 3 primary contests that remain too close to call. Another 13 (10D, 3R) women House candidates were unsuccessful in their primary bids for the U.S. House.

  • The only woman that has secured a major-party nomination in Maryland’s U.S. House contests as of Wednesday morning is Kim Klacik (R), who will challenge now-incumbent Representative Kweisi Mfume in Maryland’s 7th congressional district. Mfume defeated Klacik in the April special election to fill the remainder of Elijah Cummings’ term by 48.7 points and he is expected to win the full term in November.
  • Women candidates remaining in the races that remain too close to call as of Wednesday morning are all running to challenge incumbents in districts that strongly favor their opponent.
  • Together, these results suggest that it will be unlikely for Maryland to elect a woman to the U.S. House in 2020.

The only woman nominee thus far in Maryland’s House contests – Kim Klacik (R) – is Black. Of the 6 (3D, 3R) women who remain in races that are too close to call, 2 (2R) are Black: Patricia Rogers (R, MD-08) and Bridgette Cooper (R, MD-08).


Montana

U.S. Senate

No woman has ever served in the U.S. Senate from Montana. There are no women candidates running to challenge incumbent Senator Steve Daines (R) this year.

U.S. House

No woman currently represents Montana in the U.S. House. In fact, no woman has represented Montana in Congress since Jeanette Rankin left office in 1943. Rankin was the first woman elected to Congress, serving first from 1917 to 1919 and again from 1941 to 1943.

In 2020, Kathleen Williams (D) is 1 of 2 major-party nominees for Montana’s open and at-large U.S. House seat. Williams was also the Democratic nominee for this seat in 2018, when she was defeated by incumbent Representative Greg Gianforte (R) by 4.7 points. Cook Political Report currently rates this contest as “Likely Republican.”

One (1R) woman – Debra Lamm – was unsuccessful in her primary bid for the U.S. House.

Statewide Elected Executive Office

Six statewide executive positions are up for election in Montana this year. Women are 4 (1D, 3R) of 12 (33.3%) nominees selected for these offices. 3 (2D, 1R) women were defeated in primary elections for statewide executive offices in Montana.

  • Businesswoman Whitney Williams was the only woman running for Governor of Montana in an open-seat, competitive election. She was defeated in the Democratic primary election.
  • Kristen Juras (R) is running mate to current-Representative and gubernatorial candidate Greg Gianforte. Together, they secured the Republican nomination for November.
  • Incumbent Superintendent of Public Instruction Elsie Arntzen (R) will be challenged by Melissa Romano (D) in an all-woman general election contest.
  • Christi Jacobsen won the Republican nomination for the open seat of Secretary of State. If successful in November, she would be the first Republican woman to hold that office in Montana.


New Mexico

U.S. Senate

No woman has ever served in the U.S. Senate from New Mexico and that will not change in 2021. Just one woman – Elisa Martinez (R) – ran for the U.S. Senate this year and she was defeated in the Republican primary.

U.S. House

Women are currently 2 of 3 members of the New Mexico delegation to the U.S. House (66.7%).

All 6 (3D, 3R) major-party U.S. House nominees from New Mexico in 2020 are women. 4 (2D, 2R) women House candidates were unsuccessful in their primary bids for the U.S. House.

  • Both (2D) of New Mexico’s incumbent women representatives – who were first elected in 2018 – are running for re-election this year. Both were unopposed in their primary contests.
    • In New Mexico’s 1st congressional district, Representative Deb Haaland (D) is strongly favored to win re-election in November. She will be challenged by Michelle Garcia Holmes (R) in an all-woman contest.
    • In New Mexico’s 2nd congressional district, Representative Xochitl Torres-Small (D) will be challenged by Yvette Herrell (R) in a re-match of their 2018 all-woman contest. Small defeated Herrell by just 1.8 points in 2018 and Cook Political Report currently rates this contest as a toss-up.
  • In New Mexico’s 3rd congressional district – an open seat contest – Teresa Leger Fernandez (D) won the Democratic nomination and is strongly favored to win in November. Her opponent is also a woman: Alexis Johnson (R). Both women are Latina.
  • New Mexico’s House delegation is all but certain to be all women in 2021. This would not be the first all-woman House delegation, but it will be the largest. All-woman U.S. House delegations of more than one member have served from both Hawaii and New Hampshire.  
    • If Representative Small successfully retains her seat in November, New Mexico’s House delegation would also be all women of color in 2021. This would be the largest all-woman of color U.S. House delegation to date. Women of color have previously held both offices in Hawaii’s two-member House delegation.

Of the 6 (3D, 3R) women major-party nominees for the U.S. House from New Mexico, 5 (3D, 2R) are women of color. Incumbent Representative Deb Haaland (D, NM-01) is one of the first Native American women in Congress and 4 (2D, 2R) other women nominees are Latina: incumbent Representative Xochitl Torres Small (D, NM-02), Teresa Leger Fernandez (D, NM-03), and Michelle Garcia Holmes (R, NM-01).


Pennsylvania

U.S. House

Women are 4 (4D) of 18 members of the Pennsylvania delegation to the U.S. House (22.2%).

As of Saturday, women are 10 (7D, 3R) of 35 (28.6%) major-party nominees for U.S. House in Pennsylvania, including 7 of 17 (41.2%) Democrats and 3 of 18 (16.7%) Republicans already selected. 1 (1D) woman candidate remains in a primary contest that remains too close to call. 

  • All 4 (4D) women incumbents – Representatives Madeleine Dean (D), Chrissy Houlahan (D), Mary Gay Scanlon (D), and Susan Wild (D) – were unopposed in the primary election and will seek re-election in November. They were all elected for the first time in 2018. While Dean, Houlahan, and Scanlon are strongly favored to win in November, Wild’s re-election contest in Pennsylvania’s 7th congressional district is deemed more competitive. 
    • Dean will be challenged by Republican nominee Kathy Barnette (R) in Pennsylvania’s 4th congressional district.
    • Scanlon will be challenged by Republican nominee Dasha Pruett (R) in Pennsylvania's 5th congressional district.
    • Wild will be challenged by Republican nominee Lisa Scheller (R) in Pennsylania’s 7th congressional district.
  • 6 (3D, 3R) women have already won nominations to challenge incumbents in November. Among them, 2 (1D, 1R) are running in contests deemed competitive by Cook Political Report. Christina Finello (D) is will challenge incumbent Representative Brian Fitzpatrick (R) in Pennsylvania’s 1st congressional district, a contest  rated as “Lean Republican” by Cook Political Report. In Pennsylvania's 7th congressional district, Lisa Scheller (R) will challenge incumbent Representative Susan Wild (D) in a contest rated as “Lean Democratic” by Cook Political Report.

Of the 10 (7D, 3R) women who are major-party nominees for the U.S. House from Pennsylvania, just 1 (1R) is a woman of color: Kathy Barnette (R, PA-04) is Black. Pennsylvania has never sent a woman of color to Congress.

Statewide Elected Executive Office

Women do not currently hold any statewide elected executive offices in Pennsylvania.

As of Saturday, women are 2 (2R) of 5 (40%) major-party nominees already selected for statewide executive offices up for election in Pennsylvania, including 0 of 2 (0%) Democrats and 2 of 3 (66.7%) Republicans. 4 (4D) women, including 3 women of color, remain in Pennsylvania’s Democratic primary contest for State Auditor, which remains too close to call. 

  • Heather Heidelbaugh (R) was unopposed in the primary and will challenge incumbent Attorney General Josh Shapiro (D) in November.
  • Stacy Garrity (R) was unopposed in the primary and will challenge State Treasurer Joseph Torsella (D) in November.

Of the 2 (2R) women already selected as major-party nominees for statewide executive offices from Pennsylvania, none are women of color. No woman of color has ever been elected statewide in Pennsylvania.


South Dakota

U.S. Senate

Just one woman – Scyller Borglum (R) – ran for the U.S. Senate in South Dakota. She was defeated by incumbent Senator Mike Rounds (R).

U.S. House

Just one woman – Liz Marty May (R) – ran for South Dakota’s at-large U.S. House seat. She was defeated by incumbent Representative Dusty Johnson (R).

Women Secure Multiple Nominations in Oregon, But Few Gains Likely in November


Final votes were counted yesterday in Oregon’s congressional primary. Full context about women in the 2020 elections, including candidate lists, summaries, results from previous primaries, and historical comparisons, are available via the Center for American Women and Politics’ (CAWP) Election Watch.

Among the most notable results for women:

  • Both incumbent women running in Oregon’s congressional and statewide executive primaries – U.S. Representative Suzanne Bonamici (D, OR-01) and Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum (D) – will be on the ballot this fall and are favored to win re-election. 
  • Republican women won nominations for the U.S. Senate and 2 of 5 U.S. House districts in Oregon. They will challenge incumbents who are favored to win re-election in each of these contests in the fall.
  • In the open seat contest for Secretary of State, current State Senator Kim Thatcher secured the Republican nomination and current State Senator Shemia Fagan is competing in a Democratic primary that remains too close to call. Current Secretary of State Bev Clarno (R) is not running for re-election.


U.S. Senate

The last, and only, woman to serve in the U.S. Senate from Oregon was Maurine Brown Neuberger (D), who held office from 1960 to 1967. This year, Jo Rae Perkins (R) won the Republican nomination to challenge incumbent Senator Jeff Merkley (D) – who was unopposed in the Democratic primary – in a contest currently rated as "Solid Democratic" by Cook Political Report. Perkins was the only woman running in the four-person Republican primary. If elected, she would be the first Republican woman senator from Oregon and the first woman senator in more than 5 decades.

 
U.S. House

Women candidates secured 4 of 10 (40%) major-party nominations for U.S. House seats decided in Oregon on May 19th. Women are 2 of 5 (40%) Democratic nominees and 2 of 5 (40%) Republican nominees for the U.S. House in Oregon. 5 (3D, 2R) women candidates were unsuccessful in their primary bids for the U.S. House.

  • Incumbent Representative Suzanne Bonamici (D) – who is currently the only woman in Oregon’s five-member delegation to the U.S. House – defeated two challengers, both women, in the Democratic primary. She is strongly favored to win re-election this fall.
  • Alex Spenser (D) won the Democratic nomination in Oregon’s 2nd congressional district, home to the only open seat contest for the U.S. House in Oregon this year. She will run in a general election contest that strongly favors the Republican nominee according to Cook Political Report’s current ratings.
  • Both Republican women nominees will challenge Democratic incumbents this fall in races currently rated as "Solid Democratic" by Cook Political Report.
    • Joanna Harbour (R) will challenge incumbent Representative Earl Blumenaeur (D) in Oregon’s 3rd congressional district.
    • Amy Courser (R) will challenge incumbent Representative Kurt Schrader (D) in Oregon’s 5th congressional district.

Amy Courser (R, OR-05) identifies as multi-racial, both Native American and White. Oregon has never sent a woman of color to Congress.


Statewide Elected Executive Office

Women are currently 4 (2D, 1R, 1NP) of 5 statewide elected executive officials in Oregon. Just 3 of those offices – Attorney General, Secretary of State, and Treasurer – are up for election in 2020.

  • Incumbent Secretary of State Bev Clarno (R) did not run for re-election. She was appointed by Governor Kate Brown in 2019 upon the condition that she would not run for a full term.

This year, women are 2 of 5 (40%) major-party nominees already selected for statewide elected executive offices in Oregon, including 1 of 2 (50%) Democrats and 1 of 3 (33.3%) Republicans. 1 (1D) woman candidates was unsuccessful in her primary bid for statewide elected executive office and another - State Senator Shemia Fagan (D) - remains in the Democratic primary race for Secretary of State, which is too close to call.

  • Incumbent Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum (D) was uncontested in the Democratic primary and will compete for re-election this fall. She has served since 2012.
  • Kim Thatcher (R), who is currently a state senator, won the Republican nomination for Secretary of State. State Senator Shemia Fagan is competing in the Democratic primary that remains too close to call. If Fagan is victorious, a woman will be all but assured to be elected Secretary of State. 

Both women major-party nominees for the statewide elected executive offices in Oregon, as well as Senator Fagan, are White women. Just 1 (1NP) woman of color – Superintendent of Public Instruction Susan Castillo (2003-2012) – has ever served in statewide elected executive office in Oregon.


For primary results summaries from other states and full context about women in the 2020 elections, including candidate lists, summaries, and historical comparisons, see CAWP’s Election Watch.

Democrat Kara Eastman will Challenge Don Bacon Again in Nebraska, Seeking to Become First Democratic Woman to Represent Nebraska in Congress


Final votes were counted yesterday in Nebraska’s congressional primary. Full context about women in the 2020 elections, including candidate lists, summaries, results from previous primaries, and historical comparisons, are available via the Center for American Women and Politics’ (CAWP) Election Watch.

Among the most notable results for women:

  • Women are 2 of 3 Democratic nominees for the U.S. House from Nebraska, each challenging incumbent Republican men.
  • In Nebraska’s 2nd congressional district, Democratic nominee Kara Eastman will challenge incumbent Republican Representative Don Bacon in a rematch of their 2018 general election contest. Eastman lost her bid against Bacon by just 2 points in 2018 and this year’s contest is currently rated as Lean Republican by Cook Political Report. If Eastman defeats Bacon in November, she will be the first Democratic woman in Congress from Nebraska and the first woman to represent Nebraska in the U.S. House since 1990.


U.S. Senate

Women are currently 1 (1R) of 5 (20%) members of the Nebraska delegation to the U.S. Congress. Incumbent Senator Deb Fischer (R) is not up for re-election this year.

2 (2D) women were defeated in their primary bids for the Democratic nomination for the U.S. Senate to challenge incumbent Senator Ben Sasse (R).


U.S. House

No women currently serve in Nebraska’s three-member delegation to the U.S. House, and no woman has represented Nebraska in the U.S. House since 1990.

Women candidates secured 2 of 6 (33.3%) major-party nominations for U.S. House seats decided in Nebraska on May 12th. Women are 2 of 3 (66.6%) Democratic nominees for U.S. House and 0 of 3 (0%) Republican nominees for the U.S. House in Nebraska. All Republican nominees are male incumbents.  

  • Kara Eastman (D) will challenge incumbent Representative Don Bacon (R) in Nebraska’s 2nd congressional district. Eastman lost her bid against Bacon by just 2 points in 2018. This general election contest is currently rated as Lean Republican by Cook Political Report. If Eastman defeats Bacon in November, she will be the first Democratic woman in Congress from Nebraska and the first woman to represent Nebraska in the U.S. House since 1990. Learn more about women running again in 2020 after a 2018 loss at our Rebound Candidates page.
  • Kate Bolz (D) will challenge incumbent Representative Jeff Fortenberry (R) in Nebraska’s 1st congressional district. Fortenberry, who defeated Democrat Jessica McClure by 20 points in 2018, is strongly favored to win re-election.
  • There are no open U.S. House seats in Nebraska in this year’s election.

Both (2D) women nominees for the U.S. House from Nebraska are White women. Nebraska has never sent a woman of color to Congress nor elected a woman of color to any statewide office (U.S. Senate or statewide executive).

Special elections for U.S. House seats were also held yesterday California's 25th congressional district and Wisconsin's 7th congressional district. Tricia Zunker (D) was defeated in Wisconsin and the contest between Christy Smith (D) and Mike Garcia (R) in California is still too close to call. For primary results summaries from other states and full context about women in the 2020 elections, including candidate lists, summaries, and historical comparisons, see CAWP’s Election Watch.

Women See Success in Ohio Primary — But Most Face Steep Climb to Victory in November


Final votes were counted yesterday in Ohio’s postponed congressional primary. Full context about women in the 2020 elections, including candidate lists, summaries, results from previous primaries, and historical comparisons, are available via the Center for American Women and Politics’ (CAWP) Election Watch.

Among the most notable results for women:

  • Women are 73.3% of Democratic nominees for the U.S. House from Ohio, but only incumbents are favored to win. Just 1 non-incumbent nominee – Kate Schroder (D) – is running in a contest currently deemed competitive, though the district is rated as leaning Republican. The path toward electing new women to the House from Ohio will be difficult.
  • Nearly 40% of women U.S. House nominees in Ohio are Black women, including 2 incumbents who are 2 of 22 Black women in the House.
  • 3 (2D, 1R) women who ran and lost U.S. House races in 2018 are running again this year and will be on the ballot this fall. Learn more about 2020’s rebound candidates here.

Women are currently 3 (3D) of 18 (16.7%) members of the Ohio delegation to the U.S. Congress. No woman has ever served in the U.S. Senate from Ohio, and that will not change after the 2020 election, as there is no U.S. Senate contest in the state. 

Women are currently 3 (3D) of 16 (18.8%) members of the Ohio delegation to the U.S. House. Representative Marcy Kaptur (D, OH-9) is the longest-serving congresswoman currently in Congress. Representatives Joyce Beatty (D, OH-3) and Marcia Fudge (D, OH-11) are 2 of 22 (9.1%) Black women serving in the U.S. House.

Women candidates secured 13 of 31 (41.9%) major-party nominations for U.S. House seats decided in Ohio on April 28th. Women are 11 of 15 (73.3%) Democratic nominees for U.S. House and 2 of 16 (12.5%) Republican nominees for the U.S. House in Ohio.

  • All 3 (3D) incumbent women representatives – Joyce Beatty (D, OH-3), Marcy Kaptur (D, OH-9), and Marcia Fudge (D, OH-11) – were successful in securing Democratic nominations for re-election in their congressional districts. They are each strongly favored to be re-elected this fall.
    • In the 3rd congressional district, Representative Beatty defeated another woman, Morgan Harper, in the Democratic primary. Harper had been endorsed by Justice Democrats.
    • In the 11th congressional district, Representative Fudge will face another woman, Republican nominee Laverne Gore, in November.
  • 10 (8D, 2R) women nominees will challenge incumbents in November.
    • Among them, only 1 (1D) is running in a district currently deemed competitive by Cook Political Report; Kate Schroder (D) will challenge Representative Steve Chabot (R) in Ohio’s 1st congressional district, which Cook currently rates as leaning Republican.
    • 9 (7D, 2R) will run in districts where those incumbents are favored to win according to Cook Political Report: Jaime Castle (D, OH-2), Shannon Freshour (D, OH-4), Shawna Roberts (D, OH-6), Vanessa Enoch (D, OH-8), Desiree Tims (D, OH-10), Laverne Gore (R, OH-11), Alaina Shearer (D, OH-12), Christina Hagan (D, OH-13), and Hillary O’Connor Mueri (D, OH-14).
    • 3 (2D, 1R) of these nominees also ran for the U.S. House in 2018. Both Shawna Roberts (D, OH-6) and Vanessa Enoch (D, OH-8) were Democratic nominees in the same districts in the 2018 election. Christina Hagan (R, OH-13) ran unsuccessfully for the Republican nomination in Ohio’s 16th congressional district in 2018.
  • There are no open U.S. House seats in Ohio in this year’s election.

5 (4D, 1R) of 13 (38.5%) women nominees for the U.S. House from Ohio are Black women, including 2 (2D) incumbent representatives – Joyce Beatty (D, OH-3) and Marcia Fudge (D, OH-11) – and 3 (2D, 1R) women challengers: Vanessa Enoch (D, OH-8), Desiree Times (D, OH-10), and Laverne Gore (R, OH-11). Fudge and Gore will compete against each other in Ohio’s 11th congressional district, where Fudge is favored to win re-election. No other women of color are major party nominees in Ohio’s U.S. House contests.

For primary results summaries from other states and full context about women in the 2020 elections, including candidate lists, summaries, and historical comparisons, see CAWP’s Election Watch.

Miller, Newman Push Potential Gains for Women in Illinois Congressional Delegation

 

Congressional primaries were held on Tuesday in Illinois. The Ohio primary was postponed due to a state of emergency. Full context about women in the 2020 elections, including candidate lists, summaries, results from previous primaries, and historical comparisons, are available via the Center for American Women and Politics’ (CAWP) Election Watch.

Among the most notable results for women:

  • In Illinois’ 3rd district, Marie Newman (D) defeated the incumbent of her own party, Dan Lipinski.
    • This was the first defeat of an incumbent in the 2020 election cycle.
    • She lost to Lipinski in the 2018 primary by 2 points.
    • This seat is currently rated “Solid Democratic” by Cook Political Report, meaning this is a likely gain for Democratic women in the House.
  • Mary Miller (R) won her nomination for a House seat in Illinois’ 15th district. Cook Political Report categorizes this seat as “Solid Republican,” making this a likely gain for Republican women in November.
  • There are woman vs. woman races in three Illinois districts (2nd, 15th, 17th).
  • Betsy Dirksen Londrigan (D) won her nomination for the 13th district and will run against incumbent Rodney L. Davis (R).
    • This seat is rated as “Toss Up Republican” by Cook.

Illinois

U.S. Senate

  • Just 1 (1R) woman – Peggy Hubbard – was on the ballot for the U.S. Senate in Illinois this year. She lost her bid to challenge Democratic incumbent Senator Dick Durbin in November.
  • 2 (2D) women have served in the U.S. Senate from Illinois. Tammy Duckworth (D) is currently serving in the U.S. Senate. Carol Moseley-Braun (D), who was the first Black woman in the U.S. Senate, represented Illinois in the U.S. Senate from 1993-1998.

U.S. House

Women are currently 4 (4D) of 18 members of the Illinois delegation to the U.S. House.

Women are 14 of 34 (41.2%) major-party nominees for U.S. House in Illinois, including 8 of 17 (47.1%) Democrats and 6 of 17 (35.3%) Republicans. A total of 9 women (6D, 3R) women House candidates were unsuccessful in their bid for a U.S. House nomination.

  • All 4 (4D) of the current incumbent women are running for re-election and each will be nominees in November. Robin Kelly (IL-02), Cheri Bustos (IL-17), and Jan Schakowsky (IL-09) are strongly favored for re-election according to the Cook Political Report. Cook categorizes Freshman Representative Lauren Underwood’s (IL-14) seat as “Toss Up Democratic,” making it the only Illinois race with an incumbent Democratic woman currently deemed competitive.
  • Of the 6 (6D) women running as challengers to members of their own party in Illinois primaries, 1 (1D) – Marie Newman – was successful in Illinois’ 3rd congressional district. Newman, who previously challenged incumbent Representative Dan Lipinski (D) in 2018 and lost by just 2 points, won this year to become the first candidate to defeat an incumbent this election cycle. The general election in IL-03 is now an open seat race.
  • 2 (1D, 1R) women are nominees for the other open U.S. House seat in Illinois’ 15th congressional district. In a district that strongly favors Republicans, Mary Miller (R) is favored to win against Erika Weaver (D). Miller’s nomination and strong chances to win in November position her as a likely pick-up for Republican women in the House in 2021.
  • 8 (3D, 5R) women candidates were nominated to challenge U.S. House incumbents from Illinois in November. Only 2 (1D, 1R) are running in contests currently deemed competitive by Cook Political Report. Betsy Dirksen Londrigan (D), who was the Democratic nominee for the same seat in 2018, will challenge Republican incumbent Representative Rodney L. Davis (R) in Illinois’ 13th congressional district, which is currently rated as “Toss Up Republican” by Cook. Dirksen Londrigan lost to Davis in 2018 by less than one point. 2018 gubernatorial primary candidate Jeanne Ives (R) is the Republican nominee for Illinois’ 6th congressional district and will challenge incumbent Democratic Sean Casten in a seat currently rated “Lean Democratic.”
  • There are three woman vs. woman races in Illinois’ 2nd, 15th, and 17th congressional districts. Republican women nominees will challenge Democratic women incumbents in Illinois’ 3rd (Democratic incumbent Robin Kelly v. Republican challenger Theresa Raborn) and 17th (Democratic incumbent Cheri Bustos v. Republican challenger Esther Joy King), with both Democratic incumbents favored to win. In Illinois’ 15th congressional district, Mary Miller (R) and Erika Weaver (D) will compete for an open seat that strongly favors Miller.

Of the 14 (8D, 6R) women who are major-party nominees for the U.S. House in Illinois, 5 (3D, 2R) are women of color. Erika Weaver (D, IL-15), Lauren Underwood (D, IL-14), Robin Kelly (D, IL-2), and Philanise White (R, IL-1) all identify as Black women. Valerie Ramirez Makherjee (R, IL-10) identifies as both Hispanic and White.

There are no statewide executive elections in Illinois this year.

Despite Primary Victories, Women Unlikely to Make Gains in Mississippi Congressional Delegation

 

Congressional primaries were held on Tuesday in Mississippi. Full context about women in the 2020 elections, including candidate lists, summaries, results from previous primaries, and historical comparisons, are available via the Center for American Women and Politics’ (CAWP) Election Watch.

Among the most notable results for women:

  • Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith (R), the first woman elected to Congress from Mississippi, is likely to win re-election to a full term in the U.S. Senate this year.
  • While 2 (2D) women won major-party nominations in U.S. House contests, they are running as challengers in districts where their incumbent opponents are strongly favored to win. If that happens, Mississippi will remain a state that has never sent a woman to the U.S. House.

 

Mississippi

U.S. Senate

Just one woman has served in the Senate from Mississippi: current Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith (R). She was appointed to fill a vacancy caused by a resignation and was subsequently elected in a special election on 11/27/18. Hyde-Smith is also the only woman ever elected to Congress from the state of Mississippi.

  • Just 1 (1R) woman – Cindy Hyde-Smith – was on the ballot for the U.S. Senate in Mississippi this year. She is the incumbent senator and ran in an uncontested primary.
  • Hyde-Smith will face Democratic nominee Mike Espy in the general election. This will be a rematch of the special election contest she won in to become the first woman elected to Congress from Mississippi. The race is currently rated as “likely Republican” by Cook Political Report.

U.S. House

No woman has ever been elected to the U.S. House from Mississippi and that is unlikely to change in 2020.

Women candidates have secured 2 out of 7 (28.6%) major-party nominations for U.S. House seats decided in Mississippi on March 10th. Women are 2 of 3 (66.7%) Democratic nominees for the U.S. House and 0 of 4 (0%) Republican nominees for the U.S. House in Mississippi. Of the 2 (2R) candidates advancing to the runoff elections, 0 are women. 2 (2D) women House candidates were unsuccessful in their bid for the nomination.

  • Antonia Eliason (D) was unopposed in her bid for the Democratic nomination in Mississippi’s 1st congressional district. She will run as a challenger against incumbent Republican Trent Kelly in the general election in which Kelly is strongly favored to win, according to Cook Political Report.
  • Dorothy “Dot” Benford won the Democratic nomination in a woman v. woman primary in  Mississippi’s 3rd district. She will run as a challenger against incumbent Republican Michael Guest in the general election in which Guest is strongly favored to win, according to Cook Political Report.

There are no statewide executive elections in Mississippi this year.

March 3rd Primary Results: Texas, North Carolina Could Increase Women’s Representation in Congress; Arkansas Likely to Maintain a Women’s Delegation of Zero

 

Congressional and statewide primaries were held on Tuesday in five states: Alabama, Arkansas, California, North Carolina, and Texas. Many races in California remain too close to call, so this post will be updated as results are determined. Full context about women in the 2020 elections, including candidate lists, summaries, and historical comparisons, is available via the Center for American Women and Politics’ (CAWP) Election Watch.

Among the most notable results for women:

  • North Carolina has the potential to increase the representation of women in its congressional delegation. 2 (2D) women are nominees in districts currently represented by men that are favored to flip from Republican to Democratic control, and 1 (1R) woman advanced to a runoff in the solidly Republican district currently represented by Mark Meadows.
  • Though a large number of races remain too close to call in Texas, the state also has the potential to increase the number of women it sends to Congress. In the 24th congressional district, the race to replace retiring Kenny Marchant will be decided between two women, and 1 (1D) woman is running in an open seat race to replace a retiring congressman in a district that is rated as leaning Democrat.
  • Arkansas currently has zero women in its congressional delegation. While two Democratic women advanced in uncontested primaries, those districts are rated solidly Republican, meaning Arkansas will almost assuredly continue to have no women in Congress in 2021.
  • The lone Republican woman in the Alabama congressional delegation, Martha Roby, is retiring this year and the women running for the Republican nomination were defeated in the primary. As a result, Alabama will send no GOP women to Congress in 2021. (Current Democratic congresswoman from Alabama Terri Sewell ran unopposed in the primary and has no Republican opponent in the fall.)
  • Many races in California remain too close to call, but women are currently 34 of 98 (34.7%) nominees for U.S. House that have already been determined as of March 24th.

Alabama

Arkansas

California

North Carolina

Texas

Alabama

U.S. Senate

  • Just 1 (1R) woman – Ruth Page Nelson – was on the ballot for the U.S. Senate in Alabama this year. She lost her bid to challenge Democratic incumbent Senator Doug Jones in November.
  • 2 (2D) women have served in the U.S. Senate from Alabama, though both were appointed to fill a vacancy caused by resignation or death, and neither served more than one year: Maryon Pittman Allen (D) served from June to November 1978 and Dixie Bibb Graves (D) served from August 1937 to January 1938. No woman has been elected to the Senate from Alabama.

U.S. House

Women are currently 2 (1D, 1R) of 7 members of the Alabama delegation to the U.S. House.

Women candidates secured 3 of 8 (37.5%) major-party nominations for U.S. House seats decided in Alabama on March 3rd. Women are 3 of 4 (75%) Democratic nominees for U.S. House and 0 of 4 (0%) Republican nominees for the U.S. House in Alabama. Of the 6 (2D, 4R) candidates advancing to runoff elections on March 31, 2020, 1 (1D) – Kiani Gardner (D, AL-01) – is a woman. 

  • Incumbent Representative Martha Roby (R), one of just 13 Republican women in the U.S. House, did not run for re-election this year in Alabama’s 2nd congressional district. While 2 Republican women sought the nomination to replace her this year, they were defeated in the primary election. As a result, Alabama is sure to have no Republican women in Congress in 2021.
  • Phyllis Harvey-Hall (D) won the Democratic nomination in Alabama’s 2nd congressional district, an open seat created by Roby’s retirement that strongly favors the Republican nominee according to Cook Political Report.
  • Incumbent Representative Terri Sewell (D) was unopposed in her primary bid for re-election in Alabama’s 7th congressional district. She has no Republican opponent this fall.
  • Adia Winfrey (D) was unopposed in her bid for the Democratic nomination in Alabama’s 3rd congressional district. She will challenge incumbent Representative Mike Rogers (R) in a general election in which Rogers is strongly favored to win according to Cook Political Report

All 3 (3D) women nominees for the U.S. House from Alabama are Black women. In addition, Kiani Gardner (D) – who will advance to the Democratic primary runoff election in Alabama’s 1st congressional district – identifies as Asian/Pacific Islander.

Statewide Elected Executive Office

Just one statewide elected executive office is up for election in Alabama in 2020: Public Service Commissioner. Incumbent Twinkle Cavanaugh (R) won the Republican nomination for re-election. She will be challenged by Laura Casey (D), who won the Democratic nomination on March 3rd.

While women will be 100% of major-party candidates for statewide elected executive office on the ballot in November, they are just 2 of 10 (20%) statewide elected executive officeholders in Alabama today: Governor Kay Ivey (R) and Public Service Commission Twinkle Cavanaugh (R).

Arkansas

U.S. Senate

There were no women candidates for the U.S. Senate in Arkansas this year. Incumbent Senator Tom Cotton ran uncontested in the Republican primary and Democrats did not put forth any candidate to be Cotton’s challenger in the general election.

2 (2D) women have served in the U.S. Senate from Arkansas: Blanche Lincoln (D) served from 1999 to 2010 and Hattie Wyatt Caraway (D) served from 1931 to 1944. While first appointed to office, Caraway became the first woman to be elected to the U.S. Senate in 1932.

U.S. House

Arkansas is currently one of 12 states with no women in their congressional delegation. No woman has served in the U.S. House from Arkansas since Blanche Lincoln’s term ended in January 1997. 

In 2020, Women are 2 of 7 (28.6%) major-party nominees for U.S. House in Arkansas, including 2 of 3 (66.7%) Democrats and 0 of 4 (0%) Republicans. Each of these U.S. House primary candidates was uncontested in their bids for nomination.

  • The 2 Democratic women nominees will challenge Republican incumbents in districts deemed to be solidly Republican by Cook Political Report, including: Joyce Elliott (AR-02) and Celeste Williams (AR-03).

Joyce Elliott (D, AR-02), who identifies as Black, is the only woman of color nominee for the U.S. House. Arkansas has never sent a woman of color to the U.S. Congress.  

There are no statewide executive elections in Arkansas this year.

California

U.S. House

Women are currently 17 (17D) of 53 members of the CA delegation to the U.S. House.

As of March 24th, women are 34 of 98 (34.7%) nominees for U.S. House already selected in California, but even more women candidates are in contests that have not yet been called. CAWP will update this post as results are confirmed. Of the 34 (24D, 10R) nominees already selected, 16 (16D) are incumbents, 4 (4D) will run for open seats, and 14 (4D, 10R) will run as challengers to incumbents in November.

  • Of the 14 (4D, 10R) women challengers already nominated, only 2 (2R) are running in districts deemed competitive by Cook Political Report: Young Kim (R, CA-39), who was the Republican nominee in 2018 and lost by 3 points to Democrat Gil Cisneros, and Michelle Steel (R, CA-48). Both women identify as Asian/Pacific Islander.
  • In the 4 open seat contests where women are running (CA-08, CA-25, CA-50, CA-53), 4 (4D) women candidates have secured a nomination thus far; Sara Jacobs (D) and Georgette Gomez (D) have advanced to the general election to replace Representative Susan Davis in California's 53rd congressional district, ensuring that a woman will fill that seat. Jacobs ran for the U.S. House in 2018 in California's 49th congressional district, but did not advance to the general election. In California's 25th congressional district, current California Assemblywoman Christy Smith (D) has advanced to the general election to fill the vacancy created by Representative Katie Hill's (D) resignation last year. Both women are running in districts that favor Democrats. Christine Bubser (D) has advanced to the general election in California's 8th congressional district, which currently favors Republicans according to Cook Political Report.
  • Results are still too close to call for remaining women candidates in open seat contests.

North Carolina

U.S. Senate

  • 2 (1D, 1R) women were on the ballot for the U.S. Senate in North Carolina this year. They were both defeated in their respective party primaries. Incumbent Senator Thom Tillis (R) will run for re-election in November in a contest currently deemed leaning Republican by Cook Political Report.
  • Just two women have served in the U.S. Senate from North Carolina: Kay Hagan (D) served from 2009-2014 and Elizabeth Dole (R) served from 2003-2008.

U.S. House

Women are currently 2 (1D, 1R) of 13 members of the North Carolina delegation to the U.S. House.

Women are 7 of 25 (28%) major-party nominees for U.S. House already selected in North Carolina, including 5 of 13 (38.5%) Democrats and 2 of 12 (16.7%). One more woman – Lynda Bennett – has advanced to the runoff Republican primary election on May 12th. 5 (3D, 2R) women House candidates were unsuccessful in their primary bids for the U.S. House.

  • Both incumbent women – Republican Virginia Foxx (NC-05) and Democrat Alma Adams (NC-12) will be nominees in November and both are strongly favored for re-election according to Cook Political Report.
  • 2 (2D) women are nominees for open seats in two districts (NC-02 and NC-06) that are currently favored to flip from Republican to Democrat in November. Both Democratic women nominees – Kathy Manning (NC-06) and Deborah Ross (NC-02) – previously ran and won nominations for the U.S. Congress, but were unsuccessful in general elections.
  • 3 (2D, 1R) women will challenge incumbents in districts where those incumbents are favored to win according to Cook Political Report: Sandra Smith (R, NC-01), Patricia Timmons-Goodson (D, NC-08), and Cynthia Wallace  (D, NC-09).
  • In North Carolina’s 11th District, Lynda Bennett (R) was 1 of 2 women in a 12-person field for the Republican nomination to replace retiring Representative Mark Meadows (R). She will advance to the runoff election in May, already having the endorsement of the incumbent. This race is currently rated as solidly Republican by Cook Political Report, indicating another potential gain for women in North Carolina’s congressional delegation.

Of the 7 women who are major-party nominees for the U.S. House from North Carolina, 3 (3D) are Black women: incumbent Representative Alma Adams (NC-12), Cynthia Wallace (NC-09), and Patricia Timmons-Goodson (NC-08).

Statewide Elected Executive Office

Women are currently 3 (2D, 1R) of 10 statewide elected executive officials in North Carolina. All 10 offices, including governor, are up for election in 2020.

This year, women are 6 of 19 (31.6%) major-party nominees for statewide elected executive offices already selected in North Carolina, including 5 of 9 (55.6%) Democrats and 1 of 10 (10%) Republicans. 2 (2D) more women will compete in the Democratic primary runoff election for Lieutenant Governor. 7 (2D, 5R) women candidates were unsuccessful in their primary bids for statewide elected executive offices.

  • Both Democratic incumbents will run for re-election in November; Secretary of State Elaine Marshall (D) was uncontested in the primary State Auditor Beth Wood (D) won the Democratic nomination.
    • Republican Incumbent Labor Commissioner Cherie Berry (R) did not run for re-election this year. She is the only Republican woman ever elected to statewide executive office in North Carolina.
  • 3 (2D, 1R) women nominees will run for open statewide elected executive offices:
    • Jessica Holmes (D) was uncontested as the Democratic candidate for Commissioner of Labor.
    • Jen Mangrum (D) and Catherine Truitt (R) will compete against each other this fall to become Superintendent of Public Instruction.
  • Jenna Wadsworth (D) won the Democratic nomination to challenge incumbent Commissioner of Agriculture Steve Troxler (R) in November.

Of the 6 women who are major-party nominees for the statewide elected executive offices in North Carolina, 1 (1D) is a Black woman: Jessica Holmes (D), nominee for Commissioner of Labor. Yvonne Lewis Holley (D), who has advanced to the runoff to be the Democratic nominee for Lieutenant Governor, is also Black. North Carolina has never elected a woman of color to statewide elected office.

Texas

U.S. Senate

MJ Hegar has advanced to a runoff election for the Democratic nomination for the U.S. Senate from Texas. The winner of the runoff will challenge incumbent Senator John Cornyn (R) in November in a contest deemed solidly Republican by Cook Political Report.  

  • Just one woman has served in the U.S. Senate from Texas: Kay Bailey Hutchinson (R) served from 1993-2012. Hegar would be the first Democratic woman elected to the Senate from Texas.
  • Hegar was the Democratic nominee in Texas’ 31s congressional district in 2018; she lost to incumbent Representative John Carter by 3 points in the general election. 

U.S. House

Women are currently 6 (5D, 1R) of 36 members of the Texas delegation to the U.S. House.

Women are 18 of 56 (32.1%) nominees for U.S. House already selected in Texas and another 12 (7D, 5R) women have advanced to runoff elections on May 26, 2020. Of the 18 (13D, 5R) nominees selected, 6 (5D, 1R) are incumbents, 10 (7D, 3R) will run as challengers to incumbents, and 2 (1D, 1R) will run for open seats in November. 36 (14D, 22R) women House candidates were unsuccessful in their primary bids for the U.S. House.

  • Gina Ortiz Jones is the Democratic nominee in Texas’ 23rd congressional district, where she narrowly lost to incumbent Representative Will Hurd (R) in 2018. This year, the seat is open and is currently rated as leaning Democratic in Jones’ favor. If elected in November, Jones would be the first Asian/Pacific Islander woman in Congress from Texas as well as the first openly LGBTQ member of Congress from Texas.
  • Even with a Democratic primary runoff yet to be held, we know that the general election contest for Texas’ 24th congressional district will be between 2 women. Beth Van Duyne (R) has secured the Republican nomination and 2 women will compete for the Democratic nomination in May. This open seat, though currently held by a Republican, is deemed a toss-up by Cook Political Report.
  • Of the 10 (7D, 3R) women candidates already nominated to challenge incumbents in November, only 2 (1D, 1R) are running in a contest currently deemed competitive by Cook Political Report. Former state senator and gubernatorial nominee Wendy Davis (D) is will challenge incumbent Representative Chip Roy (R) in Texas’ 21st congressional district, which is currently rated as leaning Republican. Genevieve Collins (R) will challenge incumbent Representative Colin Allred (D) in Texas’ 32nd congressional district, which is currently rated as leaning Democrat.

Statewide Elected Executive Office

Cristi Craddick (R) is the only woman currently holding statewide elected executive office in Texas. She is 1 of 3 railroad commissioners. There are 9 total statewide elected executive offices in Texas.

This year, one of the three railroad commissioner offices, not Craddick’s, is up for election. It is the only statewide executive election in Texas in 2020. One woman – Chrysta Castañeda – has advanced to the Democratic primary runoff election on May 26, 2020. If successful, she will oppose Jim Wright, who defeated incumbent Railroad Commissioner Ryan Sitton in the Republican primary election. 

For primary results summaries from other states and full context about women in the 2020 elections, including candidate lists, summaries, and historical comparisons, see CAWP’s Election Watch page.